The good fat cookbook / Fran McCullough ; foreword by Barry Sears.

Main Author: McCullough, Frances Monson, 1939-
Published: New York ; Toronto : Scribner, c2003.
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Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

Since the 1970s, dieters have eliminated fat, yet over those years the obesity rate in America has increased 25%, explains McCullough (Low-Carb Cookbook). Demystifying concepts like HDL and LDL cholesterol, fish oil supplements, triglycerides, saturated, unsaturated, and trans fats, McCullough helps readers navigate the labyrinth of food selection. She builds on the work of Atkins, Dr. Melvin Anchell (Steak Lover's Diet), Gary Taubes, Dr. Mary Enig and the eye-opening 2001 Harvard Nurses' study (which showed no relationship between total fat consumption and heart disease). McCullough persuasively argues that highly processed foods are the worst to eat. We are still far from knowing the many mysteries of diet (soy is called into question), and while this book offers no comprehensive diet plan, it does advocate for moderation and traditional whole foods. Each "good" food-seafood, meats, coconut, eggs, butter and dairy products, avocado, walnuts-has a helpful Do's and Don'ts section. Recipes like Thai Seafood Chowder, Greek lemony Fried Potatoes (which uses olive oil), and Massaman Curry with Sweet Potatoes and Peanuts make it easy to incorporate good fats into a healthy diet. This book helps readers distinguish myth from reality in the search for better nutrition and weight loss. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by Library Journal Review

Most of us can recite it by heart: margarine is good, butter is bad; canola oil is good, lard is bad; soy is good, coconut is bad. But lately, studies suggest that these rules are wrong. Recent articles in Science, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and Nature, among other sources, propose that coconut oil, which is very similar to the fat found in human mothers' milk, is excellent for us; that butter is much better than margarine or liquid vegetable oils; and that animal fats can actually assist in weight loss. Presenting her facts well, with good documentation, McCullough (The Low-Carb Cookbook; Living Low-Carb) describes in lay terms the reasons why the highly processed oils that we've been taught to substitute for real food are not the panacea they first appeared to be. She provides a section of recipes, including Salmon Chowder and Avocado Cheesecake, as well as sources for the best-quality products. These studies may well be the next big thing in the diet and nutrition field, and public libraries should buy accordingly.-Susan B. Hagloch, Tuscarawas Cty. P.L., New Philadelphia, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.